Where there is no wi-fi: blogging

My house is a two room brick structure surrounded by concrete with with a tin roof. It has intermittent electricity, and there’s no wi-fi to be found. So how do I manage to blog from my rural Rwandan village?

Here’s what I have in the way of technology:

  • a simple laptop, case, and charger
  • SIM card for buying mobile data bundles
  • a smartphone I bought in Rwanda
  • a USB to micro-USB cord

Gone are the days of firing up the laptop, connecting wireless-ly to the cloud, and writing while also uploading and editing photos.  Gone are the days of having 10 tabs open at once. After some months of trial and error, these are the steps I now take to produce one blog post:

  1. Charge the laptop fully either while having electricity or at the health center.
  2. Draft and edit blog posts at night in a Word doc.
  3. Plug phone or storage drive into laptop and grab images for said blog post.
  4. Walk 4 miles (uphill both ways –no snow–) with laptop, cell phone, and USB drive into Huye, go to the nicest Catholic boarding house around [or second option a coffee shop with spotty wi-fi], buy a Fanta or milkshake depending on my location, add mobile data to my phone, and take a seat.
  5. Set up a hotspot
  6. Copy and paste posts onto WordPress, upload photos and add tags. I usually upload a month of posts at a time and set the to auto post every Sunday.

I can, and have, written and published many posts entirely through my phone. I prefer to type on a computer for quantity and quality writing.

This set up works OK… Not great…Not perfect but it gets the job done.  I for one will be glad to returning to the land of Starbucks and free wi-fi sooner rather than later.

Reflections from 2016

As per usual, I’m late….especially when it come to reflections about the past. I’ve spent the first few days of 2017 reflecting on 2016 and projecting about 2017 and beyond.  I am always surprised when it gets to the end of the calendar year. I am yet am not ready to leave 2016 behind. As much as I look forward to the future, I’ve always been one of those people who struggles to let things go… in all aspects of my life good, bad, and ugly.

2016 was the year I was wanted to do this and that. Some of which I accomplished, some of which I totally forgot about, some of which was denied to me due to things beyond my control, and some I just put off until later. Sigh, some things never change, and my ability to procrastinate is one of them.

As much as I try to have goals and make them happen, I don’t like to feel structured or worse, feel like I’ve failed at something. I like to keep things positive. I also don’t like to measure out my year in countries, photos, numbers, or ticking things off a bucket list. Travel means more to me than that.  It’s my sanity…my escape, and how I stay sane.  I believe in the power of travel to transform a person or at least their outlook on life.  Travel can shape you; it can make you a better person.

On that note, instead of recapping where I went, what I did, ect, I thought I’d delve a little deeper and share some of the more personal things that occurred during 2015 and what I’ve learned over the last year or so.

1.  Some things are beyond your control.

In 2013, I was diagnosed with a rare blood disorder.  Some days I slept 18 hours.  Traveling anywhere except the physician’s office and hospital was more than I could do.  I had trips planned to Cali, Colombia, and Yakima, Washington.  Neither happened.  After a rough 18 months of tracking my blood counts like a statistician, I was cleared for airplane travel on December 02, 2014.  I was in London, England on December 6th. I had managed to have a few weekends away from home during the year, but nothing like December.

In April 2015, I tripped while trail running on a local hiking trail.  I broke my left wrist and right ankle.  I was down for the count for a good five months.  I could hardly walk. My balance was totally off.  I couldn’t type, and life in general was 100X harder than it is with two functioning limbs.

Whether or not I stay healthy is largely outside my realm of control.  How I deal with the situation in 100% under my control.

I spent a large chunk of 2013-14 looking like this and a large chunk of 2015 in casts.  Thankfully 2016 had me looking somewhat normal.

2.  I’m not getting any younger.

I am five years behind the goals I made for myself in 2006 when I was travel through Italy.  That’s what travel will do for you.  I don’t regret any of it because I am a much more interesting person for having traveled like I have and being exposed to all that I have seen and been able to do. BUT I’m not getting any younger and if I want to achieve all my medical-related goals, I need to get my ass in gear.  That being said I *should* complete my BSN in July, and that will open up a whole different set of doors.   Being in school full-time is not only a financial commitment, but it’s a huge time commitment.  I feel lucky that I’ve been able to travel as much as I have this year.

3.  My travel style is ever changing.

I used to be OK with with sleeping on buses for a few days at a time. Or in airports. Or bus stations. Or on strangers’ couches.  Or anywhere that was free or really cheap.  And then I wasn’t.  Then I was OK with sharing rooms with strangers in hostels.  But now, if I had my preference, I’d rather rent an apartment and stay somewhere a few weeks at a time, or at minimum stay in a room all by myself.

I used to not care where I stayed, but now I really need my own space when travelling because sometimes I end up do yoga in my room.

Travel is exhausting. I don’t want to be on the go 24/7.  I prefer doing a region at a time, and s-l-o-w travel is much more preferable to seeing 24 countries in 9 days.  I still enjoy getting off the tourist trail and challenging myself, but I’m starting to enjoy the area that surrounds me too.  The southeastern USA is amazing…historically and photogenically.

Fall in the Great Smoky Mountains is amazing.

People often ask me where my favorite place of the places I’ve been or what’s the coolest thing I’ve ever done.  I am usually silent because I’ve done a lot of cool shit and I’ve been to a lot of cool places, but my favorite depends on the mood I’m in or what they are looking for?  I can’t even tell you how many times I’ve had this conversation in the last week.  So, Michelle, what was your favorite part of your trip? [I don’t know…I’m still processing it]  What city did you like the best?  [Ummm. Berlin was really cool, but I think I enjoyed my serendipitous layover in St Petersburg more than anything]  How does this compare to previous trips? [It doesn’t; the purpose was completely different].  I know I sound like a tool when I don’t want to talk about my travels, but who stays in a castle.  Or hikes in the wilderness alone.  Or goes swimming with sharks. I hate that I can’t just say this was the coolest things I’ve ever done off the top of my head. I feel like I’ve gotten to do so many cool things I can’t even remember them all! I mean who has a life like that?!


Wandering around German Christmas market was the cure for 2 year hiatus from international travel. It was cultural, fun, beautiful, and amazing on so many levels.

I want my future trips to be special…not just doing them because I can.  I want them to have meaning.  I’d like to do some sort of  volunteer healthcare experience at some point in the next few years as part of my masters program, but where, when, or in which fashion is still unknown.


Montenegro is one of those cool, off-beat places.

4.  I’m stronger than I thought I was

For me, 2016 was a year of facing my demons, pushing my boundaries, stepping out of my comfort zone, and overcoming specific fears.

So many times I found myself saying god, I don’t want to do this… but I sucked it up and did it anyway.

This year I spoke in public for the first time, traveled somewhere where I didn’t speak the language, went actual backpacking BY MYSELF for the first time, delivered a baby, worked in an alcohol/drug treatment center, and did pediatric clinicals in a non-English speaking area. I moved in to a living space of my very own sans roommates for the first time since 2005.

That joy that comes from accomplishing something you weren’t sure you were capable of doing is my new drug of choice. It’s awesome, and I want to keep striving for moments like that in the future.

5. I can’t do it all. I can’t do it all by myself.  It’s OK that I can’t do it all.

I definitely stretched myself too thin in 2016; I felt like I was constantly pulled in a million different directions which made focusing on things I really wanted to accomplish really hard. I said yes to too many things and that is when I get into trouble.

In December 2013, I accepted my first full-time time job since 2007, and in 2014 I started an accelerated program to become a registered nurse.  My full-time job was hospital based and between work and school I got burnt out. But I soldiered on and in 2015, I became a RN, and got a job in a different hospital. The change of scenery did not help, and I left the hospital for good in June 2016.

These were tough lessons to learn but I have decided I am going to really sit down and only do the things that I really want to do.

Maybe 2017 will be the year I finally decide to enter the grown up world.

Then again, maybe not.

Someday

We are all visitors to this time, this place. We are just passing through. Our purpose here is to observe, to learn, to grow, to love… and then we return home.                                                                        Australian Aboriginal saying

cocora

The world is a rather large place, and I love exploring new cultures, places I’ve never been, and seeing new things. And since the world is a large place, new destinations generally take precedence over places I’ve been before. Often, I say [in my head] “I’d love to come back here. Someday.” Which places are those, you ask? Places that hold a special place in my heart. There are the easy ones, like London, England where there is so much to see and do I doubt I could do it all in one lifetime. Or Charleston, South Carolina, which is an international tourist destination, but is relativity close to my current home. And Huanchaco, Peru where there isn’t a whole lot to do, but it’s where I was first part of an international community of backpackers. I’m not so naive to believe that if I went back to Huanchaco it would be the same as it was when I was there. Part of the charm of living in a tourist/backpacking town is the continuous influx of new people, but that’s also what makes it hard to fit in. Excluding the obvious, here are five places that I’d love to return to. Someday.

Mendoza, Argentina
There’s no other way to put it–Mendoza is simply amazing. The wineries

The food… [try the parilla for a plate full of delicious grilled meat]…

The scenery…

The mountains…[the tallest in the Western hemisphere]

The ruins… [some Inca ruins are all the way down to Argentina].  I only hope that someday I will make my way back to Argentina.

Isle of Skye, Scotland
Nestled up in the Scottish Highlands is the Isle of Skye. Other-worldly. Beautiful. Remote. Amazing. Skies that go for miles. Castles. Ruins. Stone footbridges.

Cartagena, Colombia
Colonial. Colorful. Safe. Fortified. Tropical. Magical. Botero statues. oh so Colombian. White, sandy beaches nearby.  Someday…

St. Petersburg, Russia

Russia in general isn’t known for its friendly, welcoming attitude towards visitors. But everyone I’ve known who has taken the time to deal with Russian bureaucracy has thought it was completely worthwhile. In 2009, I studied abroad at Moscow State University. My sole reason for doing that was to get to Russia. I didn’t care so much about the program as it was an agriculture program, and I have zero interest in farming, but from January until June I was in possession of a student visa which allowed me access to most of European Russia.

I made it to St Petersburg 4 times over the course of 6 months–each time different than before. I’d love to go back in the fall. Moscow is interesting; it is just too big of a city for me to enjoy. St Petersburg is more manageable with the added bonus of imperial Russian history. Moscow is historic in a communist sort of way. St. Petersburg, though, is more to my liking.

Kotor, Montenegro
I only spent one day and one night in Kotor as a last minute detour to defrost after being in Hungary, Romania, and Serbia. I was so glad I made time in my schedule to see this amazing small town. In January, it was as if I was the only one there. I’m told that even in summer, it gets none of the craziness like Split or Dubrovnik, Croatia. YET.

As the country of Montenegro, it has only been in existence since 2006, but its civilization dates back as far a 9th century, and it has been, at times, ruled by Italy, Ottoman Empire, and Yugoslavia. It is being “discovered” by tourists and is the second fastest growing tourist destination. Go now before it becomes just another blip on the European tourist trail.

Honorable Mention:
The Alps…any part, any country, any time of year.

Keeping perspective

I have just tried some computer updates and all my content from my blog has disappeared.

Inhale….Exhale…Keep everything in perspective…

cropped-FRISCO-2.jpg
The logo from my ‘old’ site…hopefully it’s not gone forever

I am on with live chat as I type.

10 Years! That’s how far content went back on Adventure Adikt. I am hoping it’s not gone forever.

Adventures through 50+ countries. Adventures in going back to school. Adventures in moving (and more moving). Adventures hiking. Adventures with friends. Adventures solo.

I completely changed in the last 10 years. I hardly recognize that person who landed in Italy in early February 2006. She’s changed.

A lot. Hopefully for the better.

I’ve changed careers. Twice.

I know more about ‘balance’. I think I’ve learned how to put things in perspective.

In my 20’s, life was all about following some predetermined life path set up by society.  I may have failed miserably on following the predictable path that went college—>marriage—->career—->house—->children, but I have definitely succeeded on following MY path.

I think I’m a better person than I was 10 years ago. I like to think that I am able to keep perspective in all areas of life.   If I have to start over, well, there’s no time like the present.

So you want to start a blog, do you?

I’ve had a few blogs over the years.  All were the free kind with a very specific focus.  Like when I went to south america–my blog was more like a travelogue.  When I went to nursing school, my blog was all about that….travels to Europe– more travelogues.  So I’ve learned a thing or two about blogging.  I am still no expert, but…

THINGS I’VE LEARNED:

Blogging is hard.  It’s time-consuming.  The learning curve is steep.  There’s a lot to learn even if you are technology guru. Which I’m not.  Finding ‘your voice’ takes time [I’m still finding it.  How ‘authentic’ should one be?  What constitutes over-sharing? Ect, ect.]. Writing for an audience is a lot different than writing in a journal.  Editing photos [and videos too I’d imagine, although I haven’t gone down that road yet] isn’t as easy as applying an Instagram filter and hitting ‘publish’.  Design is hard.  Getting ideas from your head into html code isn’t easy.  Reading other blogs, seeing cool features you’d like to adapt but have no idea how to do so is frustrating.  Thoughts like ‘is it stealing if I  use the same plug-in as someone else?’  ‘Will they mind?’  ‘How do I adapt it to make it different, but still what I want? ect, ect’ are ever present.

So what have I learned in since starting this blog?  I am glad you asked.

1.  Defining your purpose is crucial

everglades kayaking 1

If you can answer the question “why do I want to start a blog?’  [this goes for any type of blog], it will make your life a whole lot easier. People start blogs for many different reasons. Some to showcase a house remodel; some to showcase fashion ideas.  Some blogs are set up to keep friends and family up to date on trips around the world. Other people want a blog to show their photography to the world, and some people have a blog as their career.  They network with other travelers, bloggers, products and companies and actually make a living blogging. Whatever your goal may be having a clear purpose at the beginning will help you create a blog to address those goals.

I really wanted my first blog be like a travel journal.  It’s took a few weeks of design trial and error to decide that.  Some blogs are really cool, but they have features I’d never use, and by not using them, the blog loses something.  So for now, my blog is a ‘personal’ blog. I’ve started a new career.  I’m still in school, and I still travel as much as possible.  I’ve got a lot going on.  My blog reflects that.

Of course blogging purposes may change over time. If you think you might want to blog long term, try to develop your site with flexibility in mind.  Know that a re-design is always possible, but changing things like the title, web address, and type of blog may be committing [blog] suicide.

2.  Consider your audience or who you’d like your audience to be can help you ‘find your voice’

For most people, the first few blog posts will be aimed at friends and/or family…especially if the blog is set up prior to a long trip or housing remodel.  However, if you’d like to reach a broader audience, consider who you’d like that audience to be.  Backpackers?  Luxury travelers?  People with kids?  First timers?  Retirees?  20-somethings?  Somewhere in the middle?  A unique niche?  If you are looking to get traffic on your website, write with your audience in mind and let them know what you can do for them.

For example, my short-term goal is to finish nursing school, get experience, eventually sign on with a travel company, work as a travel nurse while earning my nurse practitioner degree. That goal is so far away right now it wouldn’t make sense for me to target people who want to do travel nursing.  None of that has anything to do with travel blogging.  But right now I CAN target students–especially older students, people who have limited time and/or money for holidays, and people who want to travel– just not travel long term.  All of that has to do with travel blogging and going to school.

3.  Thinking about your blog name now will pay dividends in the future.

Choosing a blog name is hard.  Real name vs fake name?  Full name vs Partial name?  Something with the type of blog in it or not?  Something completely different?

I went through at least 10 names before I decided on Chasing Dreams; Herding Cats, and I’ll get to why I decided on it in a minute.

First, I didn’t want use my full name as my web address, and besides, I have a fairly common name with a teeny tiny twist on the spelling of my last name.  If I type my name is a google search, the first few pages are other people with the same name as me.  However, if you want to blog under your real name and that name isn’t all that common, you shouldn’t have problem.

 If you decide to choose a pseudonym [aka something other than your real name], there are two main  things to consider:

  • Is that name available [as a domain plus any other platforms you might want to use such as Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, Google+, Reddit, ect]?  I didn’t have Twitter before I set up my blog so once I decided on a name, I set up a Twitter account with the same name…[@Adventureadikt in case you are wondering…I’m still not very Twitter savvy yet, but I’m working on it.]  I created a Facebook page as an adjunct to my personal page [called Chasing Dreams; Herding Cats…]  My Instagram account was already set up.  I just changed the name and have to refrain from posting pictures of my cat everyday, but I’m finding Instagram the easiest to use.  I’m still debating the usefulness of having Google+, Pinterest, ect account devoted to my blog, but I have already staked claim to Pinterest and Google+ as Chasing Dreams; Herding Cats.
  • Is someone else using the name you want?  If so, in most cases, it’s prudent to choose another name to avoid creating audience confusion and blog confusion.  I’m sure there are cases where it exist, but imagine the confusion for someone coming to your site but perhaps going to a porn site instead…

I first thought of creating a blog using the name Peripatetic Michelle.  I thought it was snappy.  Most people didn’t know how to spell ‘Peripatetic’, or what it meant.  I spent a lot of time spelling that word then explaining it meant essentially the same as nomad…which is a lot more common word and a lot easier to spell.

I then thought something like Out and About with Michelle would be cool.  That’s entirely too long of a name for a web address.  Out and About was taken, and I didn’t want to change the spelling too much in order to claim it. I them thought of names like Michelle’s Big Adventure [oh wait…I don’t have a big adventure]  On the road…[taken].  I went in a different direction thinking of my favorite travel quotes, poems, ect…

  • Two roads diverged[taken]  The road less traveled [from Robert Frost’s poem…taken]
  • All who wander [taken…from a Tolkien quote]
  • I’m not lost [also taken…also derived from the same quote]

Ultimately, I decided on Chasing Dreams; Herding Cats for a couple of reasons.  Life can become very stagnant without having dreams [or goals].  I think everyone should have a dream–whether it’s something lofty like visiting every country in the world or trying to find the perfect grilled cheese sandwich. The second one being it’s a nod [albeit a slight one] to the fact that I am NOT a full-time traveler.  Traveling is by far my favorite activity, but I currently have a job at a hospital, go to school full time, and have two kitties at home that keeping me on my toes.

kaos-loves-the-computer-too

4.  Platforms and hosting has nothing to do with shoes and parties

I am so glad I researched this before my first blog.  Everyone said use WordPress.  It will make your life easier.  I like easy so I used WordPress from the start.  I have never used anything else and I have not had any issues…

If I have any problem with WordPress, and really I don’t, it’s that there are SO.MANY.OPTIONS …widgets [not just -something discussed in Economics class] and plug-ins, themes and menu…it’s a bit overwhelming in the beginning.  There’s also the free [with wordpress.com] or the paid [just the name of your site].

For this blog, I use the self-hosted one at wordpress.org.  I do have to use a hosting site and I use SiteGround…I’ve never had issues, but I really don’t know enough about them.  I just googled ‘self-hosted servers’ read the reviews, and picked one.  I’ve used BlueHost in the past and while they were OK, contacting customer support usually turned into an all day affair.

Do yourself a favor though, use wordpress from the beginning.  Seriously.

5.  Choosing the right technology will make your life easy

Potion making at old operating museum

Technology is advancing every day, but choosing the right tools makes life a lot easier.

On my first big trip to the UK, I had a 2 SLR cameras and a point and shoot camera [OK…my first, first adventure was still on film!  I sound so old!] and a CD Walkman.  I used PIN telephone cards to make phone calls and sent my negatives back home.  It was frustrating.  It was slow.  Then I upgraded to a DSLR…It was still mind-nummingly frustrating to get my photos off the camera onto my Facebook page. My next adventure was a month long trip through the north eastern US and parts of Canada.  I traveled with a netbook and the same cameras.  I used my regular cell phone, but it didn’t work for the nearly two weeks I was in Canada.

For my next adventure [6 weeks in Europe in winter], I took my Kindle and the cameras.  I could upload photos taken with the kindle directly to Facebook and while writing on a Kindle isn’t the easiest thing in the world, it’s better than depending on others for technology.

I’m still working out the right amount of technology for a trip, but I’ve got a head start on what’s too much.

6.  Blogging is hard

kayaking off tybee island

It’s even harder if you are doing it on the road.  It takes time to come up with ideas, write them out, take pictures, edit them, and post it all to a blog consistently.  A blog is not a blog without content.  And yet content–or I should say GOOD content– is the hardest part of any blog.  There are millions of blogs on the web these days, and content is what makes one blog succeed while another one fails. Content and consistency.  My goal is to blog content twice a week and add a photo post in once a week.  I have found, from reading other blogs, that it is important to let the reader know how often new content will appear.  Whether its twice a day or once a week, it’s a lot easier as a reader to say ‘oh, it’s Wednesday…let me pop over to Chasing Dreams; Herding Cats and see what’s new’ than to randomly check in and get frustrated when there’s nothing new.

I have read that it helps to have a months’ worth of posts ready before you publish the first one.  I don’t have that many, but I do have a couple weeks’ worth of posts ready.

Good, regular content is the key to successful blogging.

Foot hills trail hiking

So you want to start a blog, do you?

I’ve had a few blogs over the years.  All were the free kind with a very specific focus.  Like when I went to south america–my blog was more like a travelogue… travels to Europe– more travelogues.  So I’ve learned a thing or two about blogging.  I am still no expert, but…

THINGS I’VE LEARNED:

Blogging is hard.  It’s time-consuming.  The learning curve is steep.  There’s a lot to learn even if you are technology guru. Which I’m not.  Finding ‘your voice’ takes time [I’m still finding it.  How ‘authentic’ should one be?  What constitutes over-sharing? Ect, ect.]. Writing for an audience is a lot different than writing in a journal.  Editing photos [and videos too I’d imagine, although I haven’t gone down that road yet] isn’t as easy as applying a filter and hitting ‘publish’.  Design is hard.  Getting ideas from your head into html code isn’t easy.  Reading other blogs, seeing cool features you’d like to adapt but have no idea how to do so is frustrating.  Thoughts like ‘is it stealing if I  use the same plug-in as someone else?’  ‘Will they mind?’  ‘How do I adapt it to make it different, but still what I want? ect, ect’ are ever present.

So what have I learned in since starting this blog?  I am glad you asked.

1.  Defining your purpose is crucial

everglades kayaking 1

If you can answer the question “why do I want to start a blog?’  [this goes for any type of blog], it will make your life a whole lot easier. People start blogs for many different reasons. Some to showcase a house remodel; some to showcase fashion ideas.  Some blogs are set up to keep friends and family up to date on trips around the world. Other people want a blog to show their photography to the world, and some people have a blog as their career.  They network with other travelers, bloggers, products and companies and actually make a living blogging. Whatever your goal may be having a clear purpose at the beginning will help you create a blog to address those goals.

I really wanted my first blog be like a travel journal.  It’s took a few weeks of design trial and error to decide that.  Some blogs are really cool, but they have features I’d never use, and by not using them, the blog loses something.  So for now, my blog is a ‘personal’ blog.  I’ve got a lot going on.  My blog reflects that.

Of course blogging purposes may change over time. If you think you might want to blog long term, try to develop your site with flexibility in mind.  Know that a re-design is always possible, but changing things like the title, web address, and type of blog may be committing [blog] suicide.

2.  Consider your audience or who you’d like your audience to be can help you ‘find your voice’

For most people, the first few blog posts will be aimed at friends and/or family…especially if the blog is set up prior to a long trip or housing remodel.  However, if you’d like to reach a broader audience, consider who you’d like that audience to be.  Backpackers?  Luxury travelers?  People with kids?  First timers?  Retirees?  20-somethings?  Somewhere in the middle?  A unique niche?  If you are looking to get traffic on your website, write with your audience in mind and let them know what you can do for them.

For example, my short-term goal is to finish nursing school, get experience, eventually sign on with a travel company, work as a travel nurse while earning my nurse practitioner degree. That goal is so far away right now it wouldn’t make sense for me to target people who want to do travel nursing.  None of that has anything to do with travel blogging.  But right now I CAN target students–especially older students, people who have limited time and/or money for holidays, and people who want to travel– just not travel long term.  All of that has to do with travel blogging and going to school.

3.  Thinking about your blog name now will pay dividends in the future.

Choosing a blog name is hard.  Real name vs fake name?  Full name vs Partial name?  Something with the type of blog in it or not?  Something completely different?

I went through at least 10 names before I decided on Adventure Adikt, and I’ll get to why I decided on it in a minute.

First, I didn’t want use my full name as my web address, and besides, I have a fairly common name with a teeny tiny twist on the spelling of my last name.  If I type my name is a google search, the first few pages are other people with the same name as me.  However, if you want to blog under your real name and that name isn’t all that common, you shouldn’t have problem.

 If you decide to choose a pseudonym [aka something other than your real name], there are two main  things to consider:

  • Is that name available [as a domain plus any other platforms you might want to use such as [Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, Google+, Reddit, ect]?  I didn’t have Twitter before I set up my blog so once I decided on a name, I set up a Twitter account with the same name…[@Adventureadikt in case you are wondering…I’m still not very Twitter savvy yet, but I’m working on it.]  I created a Facebook page as an adjunct to my personal page.  My Instagram account was already set up.  I just changed the name and have to refrain from posting pictures of my cat everyday, but I’m finding Instagram the easiest to use.  I’m still debating the usefulness of having Google+, Pinterest, ect account devoted to my blog, but I have already created a Adventure Adikt borad for my Pinterest account
  • Is someone else using the name you want?  If so, in most cases, it’s prudent to choose another name to avoid creating audience confusion and blog confusion.  I’m sure there are cases where it exist, but imagine the confusion for someone coming to your site but perhaps going to a porn site instead…

I first thought of creating a blog using the name Peripatetic Michelle.  I thought it was snappy.  Most people didn’t know how to spell ‘Peripatetic’, or what it meant.  I spent a lot of time spelling that word then explaining it meant essentially the same as nomad… which is a lot more common word and a lot easier to spell.

I then thought something like Out and About with Michelle would be cool.  That’s entirely too long of a name for a web address.  Out and About was taken, and I didn’t want to change the spelling too much in order to claim it. I them thought of names like Michelle’s Big Adventure [oh wait…I don’t have a big adventure]  On the road…[taken].  I went in a different direction thinking of my favorite travel quotes, poems, ect…

  • Two roads diverged[taken]  The road less traveled [from Robert Frost’s poem… taken]
  • All who wander [taken… from a Tolkien quote]
  • I’m not lost [also taken… also derived from the same quote]

Ultimately, I decided on Adventure Adikt for a couple of reasons.   Life can become very stagnant without having adventures.  I think everyone should have a dream–whether it’s something lofty like visiting every country in the world or trying to find the perfect grilled cheese sandwich and that can constitute an adventure.  Traveling is by far my favorite activity, but I currently have a job at a hospital, go to school full time, and have two kitties at home that keeping me on my toes.

kaos-loves-the-computer-too

4.  Platforms and hosting has nothing to do with shoes and parties

I am so glad I researched this before my first blog.  Everyone said use WordPress.  It will make your life easier.  I like easy so I used WordPress from the start.  I have never used anything else and I have not had any issues…

If I have any problem with WordPress, and really I don’t, it’s that there are SO.MANY.OPTIONS …widgets [not just -something discussed in Economics class] and plug-ins, themes and menu…it’s a bit overwhelming in the beginning.  There’s also the free [with wordpress.com] or the paid [just the name of your site].

For this blog, I use the self-hosted one at wordpress.org.  I do have to use a hosting site and I use SiteGround… I’ve never had issues, but I really don’t know enough about them.  I just googled ‘self-hosted servers’ read the reviews, and picked one.  I’ve used BlueHost in the past and while they were OK, contacting customer support usually turned into an all day affair.

Do yourself a favor though, use wordpress from the beginning.  Seriously.

5.  Choosing the right technology will make your life easy

Potion making at old operating museum

Technology is advancing every day, but choosing the right tools makes life a lot easier.

On my first big trip to the UK, I had a 2 SLR cameras and a point and shoot camera [OK… my first, first adventure was still on film!  I sound so old!] and a CD Walkman.  I used PIN telephone cards to make phone calls and sent my negatives back home.  It was frustrating.  It was slow.  Then I upgraded to a DSLR… It was still mind-nummingly frustrating to get my photos off the camera onto my Facebook page. My next adventure was a month long trip through the north eastern US and parts of Canada.  I traveled with a netbook and the same cameras.  I used my regular cell phone, but it didn’t work for the nearly two weeks I was in Canada.

For my next adventure [6 weeks in Europe in winter], I took my Kindle and the cameras.  I could upload photos taken with the kindle directly to Facebook and while writing on a Kindle isn’t the easiest thing in the world, it’s better than depending on others for technology.

I’m still working out the right amount of technology for a trip, but I’ve got a head start on what’s too much.

6.  Blogging is hard

kayaking off tybee island

It’s even harder if you are doing it on the road.  It takes time to come up with ideas, write them out, take pictures, edit them, and post it all to a blog consistently.  A blog is not a blog without content.  And yet content–or I should say GOOD content– is the hardest part of any blog.  There are millions of blogs on the web these days, and content is what makes one blog succeed while another one fails. Content and consistency.  My goal is to blog content twice a week and add a photo post in once a week.  I have found, from reading other blogs, that it is important to let the reader know how often new content will appear.  Whether its twice a day or once a week, it’s a lot easier as a reader to say ‘oh, it’s Wednesday…let me pop over to Chasing Dreams; Herding Cats and see what’s new’ than to randomly check in and get frustrated when there’s nothing new.

I have read that it helps to have a months’ worth of posts ready before you publish the first one.  I don’t have that many, but I do have a couple weeks’ worth of posts ready.

Good, regular content is the key to successful blogging.

Foot hills trail hiking

A certain milestone

Hi, my name is Michelle.  Welcome to my blog.

So I did a thing… well two things really if you count one of them as this blog.  Well, three if you count having a milestone birthday… which I did today.  The thing about milestone birthdays, at least for me, are indications that I should re-evaluate my life and see if I am on the path I want to be on.  And while I love my job, it is not a job I want to be doing for the next 35 years.  So here I am, re-evaluating my life’s plan.

Milestone birthdays–not just markers of time…

The Blog

Adventure Adikt*, is my blog 2.0.  I wasn’t really sure what to do with this re-incarnation of the blog. I started blogging way back in 2005 as a way to process my feelings about life and death, love and loss, endings and beginnings, and whatever else life was throwing at me.  Back then, I’d just graduated college, moved to a new city, started my first job in healthcare working with teeny tiny babies and really sick children. I processed all those changes by writing. And traveling.

But I wasn’t ready to release those thoughts into the blog-o-sphere. So I blogged for me.  It was essentially an on-line [but private] journal.

So here it is, a few years later. I’m still in healthcare. I have moved back to South Carolina. I want to buy a fixer-upper. Grad school is in my future although I still can’t decide between physician, physician assistant, or nurse practitioner, so until I do, I’m going to keep plugging along. And traveling. A lot. And writing to process my feelings.

In order to to avert my impending mid (?)-life crisis, I’ve decided to go public for the first time ever. I love my job. I love learning languages.  I love history, the history of places, and the history of things. I love science–what it is now and what it used to be.

In a nutshell, my ‘new’, reformatted blog is a [very] vaguely chronological timeline of life events, travel, and mishaps along with some life lessons and musings thrown in for fun.  Life is life. Adventure is still adventure, and wanderlust is still wanderlust; I’m trying to find new ways of having a bit of each in my every day.

The ‘other news’

While opening up the blog to the public is one attempt to stave off the potential mid life crisis, some may say I’m already in full blown crisis mode.  Earlier today, as I am prone to do when I’m bored, I was surfing the ‘net for airline deals.  And I came across a steal.  Without truly thinking things all the way through, I jumped on it.  I found a one-way flight from Charlotte to Caracas for $99.  I bought it.  Have I ever been to Venezuela?  No. Have I ever even wanted to go to Venezuela?  Not particularly.  But I studied their history while in college. I speak the language. And I really do want to see Angel Falls.  What else will I do?  Who knows?  Where will I stay?  Not sure. Will I be kidnapped by narco-terrorists?  I certainly hope not.  And the big one– When will I come back?  I’m not sure.  Maybe I’ll hate it and only be gone a week. Maybe I’ll love it and try to figure out a way to stay permanently.  Who knows? But follow along and see how this little adventure plays out.

bulls island - Copy
Edisto Island, SC

And #3?

I turned 24 today. It’s a big milestone. I’ve always thought of  mid 20’s as adults.  I am nowhere near ready to be an adult. And truthfully, I’m freaking out just a bit.

*Why Adventure Adikt?  I went through a lot of names [A Traveler Rests, Black Cats Travel was a couple of them] before I decided on this one.  Somehow, it just fit.  And I like the word adikt better than the word junkie. I seek out adventure–in all ways, traveling to foreign countries to explore history and culture, hiking in my back yard and across the country, trying out new recipes in the kitchen, and life in general. My goal is to never stop learning and never stop adventuring… just never stop.